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Seattle, Oregon, unintended consequences, work hours, scheduling, Fair Work Week, labor

Against Flexibility?

Do politicians have any idea what they are doing? In Oregon, Senate Bill 828 just passed the Senate and is now being favorably reviewed in the House. The law would require “large employers in specified industries to provide new employee[s] with estimated work schedule and to provide current employee with






minimum wage, business, pay, workers, fallacy, profit, Bernie Sanders

Minimally Mugged By Reality

It should shock no one: forcing businesses to pay steep minimum wages ends up pushing some businesses out . . . of business. Yesterday I looked at what minimum wage laws can do to low-skilled workers. Today, consider the employers. When we make it harder to turn a profit, it






Mitch McConnell, Rand Paul, ObamaCare, healthcare bill, opposition

The Real ObamaCare Opposition

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky) has introduced a bill to compromise between the House’s recent Affordable Health Care Act and the current “ObamaCare” Affordable Care Act. Though there seems to be some “what the heck, go with it” enthusiasm for it on Capitol Hill, it’s not coming from Senators






Amazon, monopoly, trusts, antitrust, trade, free trade, big business, economic myths

Serving Consumers? Punish!

New media ballyhooer Douglas Rushkoff made waves this week. Citing an un-named friend who went hysterical about Amazon.com’s purchase of Whole Foods, he asserted that such “unease is widespread, and has raised new calls for breaking up Jeff Bezos’s impending monopoly by force.”* The company has “surely,” he claimed, “reached






stadium, Potomac Nationals, pork, free markets, taxes, referendum, crony, welfare

Go Nats?

Just a few miles away from where I live sits the stadium of the Potomac Nationals. I’m a fan. I’d hate to see the team we call the P-Nats leave. But . . . Hasta la vista. The owner of this minor league affiliate of Major League Baseball’s Washington Nationals






conundrum, employment, unemployment, Gerald P. O’Driscoll, poverty, retirement

The Poverty Retirement Non-plan

A “conundrum” is “an intricate and difficult problem” or “a question or problem having only a conjectural answer.”* In his June 8 article, “The Jobs Conundrum,” economist Gerald P. O’Driscoll focuses on a very big problem that we do not have sure answers to, yet. Unemployment figures are down, but






nanny state, too much government, books, authentication, California, busybody, Brian Doherty’s Radicals for Capitalism, Jerry Brown

Signature Nonsense

Did anyone really need this? Last year, California’s Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Assembly Bill No. 1570, which concerns collectibles, particularly signed-by-author or artist books. But it doesn’t mention books, and is confusingly written. What a mess. Who asked for it? It certainly wasn’t the struggling booksellers who have






Oregon, housing, rent control, urban, planning, low income, land, property rights

Housing Horror

Housing in Oregon’s north-central urban region is becoming more and more like San Francisco’s — out of the budgetary reach of huge swaths of average workers. “The median rental household can’t comfortably afford a two-bedroom apartment in 28 of Oregon’s 36 counties,” Elliot Njus writes for The Oregonian. But it is worst in






Seattle , soda tax, nanny state, tax, socialist, social engineering

Sin, Soda and Say

Government policy in Seattle, Washington, is being driven by an outright socialist on the city council. The mayor, apparently starving for attention, proposed a goofy new sin tax last year. Now, writes Reason’s Baylen Linnekin, “Seattle lawmakers are expected to vote early next week on a citywide soda tax that






minimum wage, closure, restaurant, business, prohibition, wages, pay, Berkeley, San Francisco

Minimum Shock

“Three restaurants vacated the Bay this week, with Berkeley’s Bistro Liaison getting the most attention,” the San Francisco edition of Eater informs us. “It’s a bittersweet exit for the owners, who plan to start new careers.” The week in question was in February. But this was not an isolated event.






New York Times, taxes, tax, libraries, tax cuts, big government, public services, free markets

Ballots & Books

The people of Roseburg, Oregon, aren’t paying enough in taxes. That’s the upshot of Kirk Johnson’s recent New York Times article, “Where Anti-Tax Fervor Means ‘All Services Will Cease.’” “For generations in America,” readers are informed, “small cities . . . declared their optimism and civic purpose with grand libraries






juicer, juice, silicon valley, innovation, risk, luxury, free markets, government waste, freedom

Juicer Choosers

We all have our complaints about this company or that, this product or that.* And it is popular to rag on “consumerism” and the emptiness of “capitalism.” But put it into perspective: me “wasting money” on, say, an expensive juicer is nowhere near as offensive — that is, worth a






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