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savings bond, family, interest rates, economics, savings,

Negative Logic

“The idea that negative interest rates will produce loans and generate growth,” concludes Richard Rahn in a Washington Times op-ed, “is not supported by the evidence to date.” Citing current markets for Danish and Swiss bonds, Rahn states that “approximately 30 percent of the global government bond issues are now

body cam, camera, police, feds, federal, crime, law,

Don’t Follow the Feds

“Federal agents never wear body cameras,” The Washington Post reports, “and they prohibit local officers from wearing them on their joint operations.” That’s why a growing number of local law enforcement agencies are doing what Atlanta’s police chief and mayor “decided late last month,” pulling “out of joint task forces

Kamala Harris, statistics, pay gap, sexism,

Why Lie?

Democratic presidential contender and U.S. Senator from California Kamala Harris leaned in to the big lie. Debuting a new proposal to “close the gender pay gap,” she declared that, “In America today, women for the same work, for the equal work, on average make 80 cents on the dollar, black

Bernie Sanders, 15, minimum wage, magic,

Pick a Number

Is the number 15 “magical”? The “democratic socialists” now dominating the Democratic Party first went for the $15 national minimum wage notion. Now it’s a cap on consumer credit interest rates, at 15 percent. What’s next, 15 mph speed limits? Age 15 allowed to vote?  Fifteen men on a dead

Joe Biden, licensing, salon, Occupational licensing, cosmetology, license

Hairdressers Unbound?

Joe Biden, late of the U.S. Senate and Blair House, is not someone I typically rush to for policy advice. Were I looking for a weather vane to indicate whence bad ideas come a-gusting, in full poisonous gasbaggery, Biden might serve as well as any of the budding socialists now

socialism, magic wand, economics, healthcare, prescription drugs, drugs,

Just Like That!

“We will do that,” he said. Do what? “We will look at the average costs of prescription drugs in Canada, the UK, Germany, Japan and France,” says Sen. Bernie Sanders (I/D-Vt.), “which are 50 percent lower than they are in the United States,” he told Margaret Brennan on Face the

Bitcoin, cryptocurrency, Venezuella, freedom, privacy, cash, money

Bitcoin to the Rescue

I own no Bitcoin; it’s not my thing. The blockchain concept Bitcoin is based upon seems clever, sure, but I often curse at my “devices,” so only my politics prevents me from full-blown Luddism.  Besides, when I think “the people’s money” I don’t think “private fiat currency.” Which is what

Bernie Sanders, Finland, health care, socialism, single payer, costs, spending

Finns Fail at Fix

Finland’s government-run health care system is a mess.  This normally wouldn’t faze me much. I have to navigate our American mess, er, system. But Finland’s medical service delivery system is relevant to Americans — as is Denmark’s and Norway’s and Sweden’s — because the current crop of Democratic presidential hopefuls

licensing, license, permission, work, labor, regulations

Opportunity for . . . All?

Simple pleasures are the best. So are simple questions. Senate Bill 2306 in North Dakota “would make it easier for spouses of military personnel to transfer their existing occupational licenses for use in North Dakota, provided they are in good standing and licensed by a reasonable entity,” explains Rob Port

Paul Krugman, libertarianism, libertarian, freedom, shutdown

A Former Economist

Paul Krugman, New York Times columnist and former economist, tested our patience last week with “Trump’s Big Libertarian Experiment.” How many non sequiturs will squeak past the Gray Lady’s editorial department?  Loads — and all about how the federal government shutdown gives limited government folks what they want: less government.

tenement, rent control, New York, de Blasio

Towards a Genealogy of Policy

If it seems like each new government program is more intrusive than the last, there’s a reason. That last one did not work as planned. So a new one gets concocted to fix its mess.  The latest? New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has established a new enforcement bureau,

San Francisco, homeless, zoning, housing, regulations

San Francisco Obstructionism

Bob Tillman wants to build a 75-unit apartment building in San Francisco. He owns the property — a laundromat. He just wants to convert it. But although there are no good reasons why he shouldn’t, city officials and activists opposed to the property rights of developers have been blocking the

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