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Seattle, Oregon, unintended consequences, work hours, scheduling, Fair Work Week, labor

Against Flexibility?

Do politicians have any idea what they are doing? In Oregon, Senate Bill 828 just passed the Senate and is now being favorably reviewed in the House. The law would require “large employers in specified industries to provide new employee[s] with estimated work schedule and to provide current employee with






minimum wage, business, pay, workers, fallacy, profit, Bernie Sanders

Minimally Mugged By Reality

It should shock no one: forcing businesses to pay steep minimum wages ends up pushing some businesses out . . . of business. Yesterday I looked at what minimum wage laws can do to low-skilled workers. Today, consider the employers. When we make it harder to turn a profit, it






democracy, the people, politicians, cowardice, marijuana, asset forfeiture, initiative, term limits, police brutality

Today’s Leaders

We have a new president. Many people put a lot of trust in him — and many more hate him and seek to bring him down. In both cases, presidential politics takes up an inordinate portion of our brain space. Over the weekend I twice wrote about four heroic senators,






Mitch McConnell, Rand Paul, ObamaCare, healthcare bill, opposition

The Real ObamaCare Opposition

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky) has introduced a bill to compromise between the House’s recent Affordable Health Care Act and the current “ObamaCare” Affordable Care Act. Though there seems to be some “what the heck, go with it” enthusiasm for it on Capitol Hill, it’s not coming from Senators






Amazon, monopoly, trusts, antitrust, trade, free trade, big business, economic myths

Serving Consumers? Punish!

New media ballyhooer Douglas Rushkoff made waves this week. Citing an un-named friend who went hysterical about Amazon.com’s purchase of Whole Foods, he asserted that such “unease is widespread, and has raised new calls for breaking up Jeff Bezos’s impending monopoly by force.”* The company has “surely,” he claimed, “reached






stadium, Potomac Nationals, pork, free markets, taxes, referendum, crony, welfare

Go Nats?

Just a few miles away from where I live sits the stadium of the Potomac Nationals. I’m a fan. I’d hate to see the team we call the P-Nats leave. But . . . Hasta la vista. The owner of this minor league affiliate of Major League Baseball’s Washington Nationals






conundrum, employment, unemployment, Gerald P. O’Driscoll, poverty, retirement

The Poverty Retirement Non-plan

A “conundrum” is “an intricate and difficult problem” or “a question or problem having only a conjectural answer.”* In his June 8 article, “The Jobs Conundrum,” economist Gerald P. O’Driscoll focuses on a very big problem that we do not have sure answers to, yet. Unemployment figures are down, but






nanny state, too much government, books, authentication, California, busybody, Brian Doherty’s Radicals for Capitalism, Jerry Brown

Signature Nonsense

Did anyone really need this? Last year, California’s Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Assembly Bill No. 1570, which concerns collectibles, particularly signed-by-author or artist books. But it doesn’t mention books, and is confusingly written. What a mess. Who asked for it? It certainly wasn’t the struggling booksellers who have






milk, Institute for Justice, regulations, Ocheesee Creamery, Department of Agriculture, too much government

Legal Not to Lie About Your Milk

Mary Lou Wesselhoeft doesn’t have to lie about the milk she’s selling. The Florida Department of Agriculture has lost in court. Mary Lou has won. Ocheesee Creamery sells pasteurized milk without any additives. One of her products is skim milk. Ocheesee sells skim milk without vitamin additives, which is perfectly






Ohio, initiative, legislature, Ohio Constitutional Modernization Commission,

Citizens Triumphant

Last week, the Ohio Constitutional Modernization Commission considered whether to recommend a constitutional change to create an obvious double standard: requiring citizen-initiated constitutional amendments to obtain a 55 percent supermajority vote, while the very same amendments proposed by legislators would only need 50-percent-plus-one for passage. I traveled to the capitol






Seattle , soda tax, nanny state, tax, socialist, social engineering

Sin, Soda and Say

Government policy in Seattle, Washington, is being driven by an outright socialist on the city council. The mayor, apparently starving for attention, proposed a goofy new sin tax last year. Now, writes Reason’s Baylen Linnekin, “Seattle lawmakers are expected to vote early next week on a citywide soda tax that






Great Britain, Tory, Prime Minister, PM, censorship, terrorism, internet, web

Another Push for Censorship

It’s almost as if politicians are hell-bent on expanding government at the expense of our freedoms . . . and grandstanding to ‘look like they are doing something.’ The two proclivities are not unrelated. Take Theresa May, Great Britain’s Tory Prime Minister. After yet another terrorist attack in her country,






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