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Florida, school, shooter, shooting, mass killing, name, guns, gun control

Killer Inlaudabilis

On the day that Alexander the Great was born, or so the ancients tell us, a man named Herostratus burned down one of the Seven Wonders of the World, the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus. Why? Just for the infamy. Which is why the Ephesians proscribed mention of the man’s

tea party, nail, coffin, spending, debt, responsibility, dead

“Our Agenda Was Common Sense”

The Republican Party doesn’t need to bury the corpse. Its victim has been assimilated, like the Borg did with alien peoples in the Star Trek universe, or maybe it was just soaked up as if the GOP were a giant fungus amongus. So, what’s dead? The Tea Party, which was

occupational, licensing, permission, unions, protectionism, regulation, license, law

The Winds of Regulation

Among the many goofy occupational licensing laws in these United States, Arizona’s licensing for professional blow-drying services is up there with the silliest.  “Under current law, using a blow-dryer on someone else’s hair, for money, requires more than 1,000 hours of training and an expensive state-issued license,” we learn at Reason. “Blow-drying hair

Tesla, Elon Musk, SpaceX, launch, space, orbit, government

Red Roadster Rides Outer Space

On Tuesday, SpaceX launched one of the largest rockets ever, the Falcon Heavy. Because it is still experimental, it didn’t carry up an expensive satellite. Too early for that. Instead, it has sent up a Tesla Roadster. And it’s not aiming for orbit . . . around Earth. It’s aiming

Frankenstein, monster, shut down, shutdown, Congress, government, deep state

The Politics of Inertia

Congress’s failure to establish, last week, any semblance of budgetary responsibility led to one of those “government shutdowns” that the press likes to yammer about so breathlessly. Then, early this week, Senate holdouts caved, allowing a short-term fix to bring the federal government fully back to life, like the monster

California, pension, crisis, canary, cage, coal mine, spending, taxes

Babylon Goes Broke

A few Babylonian, er, California cities going bankrupt — Stockton, Vallejo, and Bell — should be seen as more than dead canaries in a coalminer’s care. Indeed, you don’t need special prophetic gifts to see the dangers posed by over-promising cushy pensions to government workers. Californians are coming around. And

USSR, Soviet Union, communism, socialism, apologist, New York Times

The Times Must Change

“Political leaders prefer to project a noble history, sometimes by turning complicity in atrocities into claims of victimhood,” the New York Times informed us last Sunday. “In Russia, Mr. Putin and many of his lieutenants came from the K.G.B. and resisted fully confronting its repressive history. And they, like many

Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, boarding pass, United, airlines

Queen Sheila: Terror of the Skies

What’s all the fuss? Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tex.) was escorted ahead of all the other passengers onto a United Airlines flight from Houston to Washington, D.C., taking seat 1A in first class. The congresswoman described it as “nothing exceptional or out of the ordinary.” Meanwhile, Jean-Marie Simon possessed a

Amtrak train derailed, Seattle, I-5, infrastructure, Donald Trump

A Good Tragedy Not Wasted

No matter how “not as bad as we feared” President Donald Trump may be appearing, as we close out the year let’s remember why some of us did not trust him in the first place: his knee-jerk reactions are too often witlessly statist. The speeding Amtrak train that derailed over

Tim Eyman, doll, petition, taxes, Washington, initiative, democracy, voters

What Unlimited Government Costs Us

“Olympia can’t restrain itself,” Tim Eyman wrote the other day, a judgment on legislative irresponsibility hardly unique to the Evergreen State. Citizens around the country have cause to lament the difficulty of obtaining anything close to a good legislature. Too often the merely “bad” would constitute a significant improvement. Which

Google, search results, Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, bias, influence, tampering, election, democracy

The Online Manipulation of Democracy

There exist many sneaky ways to get other people to do what you want, voluntarily — effectively blurring the line between legitimate persuasion and fraud. When large, almost unavoidable private companies apply those techniques to targeted groups of voters, that blur might look something very much like election fraud. Harvard psychologist

Evergreen, students, protest, Heying, Weinstein

The Common School Agenda

The rise of campus radicalism, write Heather Heying and Bret Weinstein in the “Washington Examiner, appears to “validate every fantasy the Right ever had about the Left.”* Heying and Weinstein, who have resigned their positions at Washington State’s public liberal arts college, Evergreen, detail what went wrong at the college

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