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Tom Woods

Thomas E. Woods, Jr.

[I]f we are to make sense of American history, the Constitution, and the options before us as we confront Jefferson’s nightmare — namely, a government that acknowledges no fixed limits to its power — we have an obligation to understand it. Thomas E. Woods, Jr., Nullification: How to Resist Federal






Gustave de Molinari

Gustave de Molinari

A community of interests and needs is the foundation of human friendship, while the opposition of needs and interests is not only capable of provoking antipathy, but it is notorious that nothing on earth has the same power of moving a man to violent and implacable hatred as a member






Ernest Bramah

Ernest Bramah

Two resolute men, acting in concord, may transform an Empire, but an ordinary resourceful duck can escape from a dissentient rabble. Ernest Bramah, as quoted by Lin Carter, Kai Lung Unrolls His Mat, introduction (Ballantine Books, 1974).






Don Quixote and the Birds and Bats, Gustave Doré

Miguel de Cervantes

’Tis vain to look for birds in last year’s nests. Don Quixote in Miguel de Cervantes’s novel Don Quixote (1605).






Lysander Spooner

Lysander Spooner

The science of mine and thine — the science of justice — is the science of all human rights; of all a man’s rights of person and property; of all his rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Lysander Spooner, Natural Law; or, The Science of Justice, Section






Ernest Bramah

Ernest Bramah

However deep you dig a well it affords no refuge in the time of flood. Ernest Bramah, “The Story of Tong So, the Averter of Calamities,” Kai Lung Unrolls His Mat (1928)






Stendhal

Stendhal

Almost all our misfortunes in life come from the wrong notions we have about the things that happen to us. To know men thoroughly, to judge events sanely, is, therefore, a great step towards happiness. Stendhal, journal entry (December 10, 1801)






Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary Wollstonecraft

In order that liberty should have a firm foundation, an acquaintance with the world would naturally lead cool men to conclude that it must be laid, knowing the weakness of the human heart, and the ‘deceitfulness of riches,’ either by poor men, or philosophers, if a sufficient number of men,






Destutt de Tracy medallion

Destutt de Tracy

[W]ith respect to economy . . . [u]nder this relation society consists only in a continual succession of E X C H A N G E S, and exchange is a transaction of such a nature that both contracting parties both gain by it. . . . We cannot cast our eyes on a civilized country without seeing






Jefferson Nickel 2004

Thomas Jefferson

[T]he horrors of neologism, which startle the purist, have given no alarm to the translator; where brevity, perspicuity, and even euphonium can be promoted by the introduction of a new word, it is an improvement of language. It is thus the English language has been brought to what it is;






Herbert Spencer

Herbert Spencer

The current opinion that science and poetry are opposed is a delusion. . . . Think you that a drop of water, which to the vulgar eye is but a drop of water, loses any thing in the eye of the physicist who knows that its elements are held together by a force






Herbert Spencer

Herbert Spencer

Man needed one moral constitution to fit him for his original state; he needs another to fit him for his present state; and he has been, is, and will long continue to be, in process of adaptation. Herbert Spencer, “The Evanescence of Evil,” Part 1, Chapter 2 of Social Statics:






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